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AmI biting off more than I can Chew?
#1
I have always been into Aquariums, (Big Ones) 220 gals, 100 Gals etc, I know a lot about fish both fresh and marine, However, I started reading about Dart Frog and thought that would be a lot of fun. I have a 220 gal Plexi-glass Tank that I am not using right now. It looks great and I think would make a great Vivarium. I know it might be more costly to do a big tank like that but I am OK with the cost. and I don't want to do a 1/2 job. Right now I have over $2500 into a 100 gal Fish aquarium. My question is... Am I stupid to start out so big, am I biting off more than I can chew. My goal would be to have this tank set up with a water fall, pool, fish, Misting system, and whatever it takes to make it look great. Also, is it possible to have several frogs in the same tank. These are things that I don't know and I don't want to think about getting a frog or frogs until my tank is completely set up and has been running for a while. Thanks
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#2
Hi Mikechri,
While some would disagree, I don't think starting out with a large tank would be a mistake....provided you are willing to take your time and understand that cheap short cuts are not the best solution. Do as much research as possible before starting to be sure this is for you.
One thing to keep in mind is that working with acrylic is a little tricky compared to working with glass, as nothing wants to stick to acrylic. You will need to scuff the surface where ever you are going to want to adhere things, so if you want to have a background in this tank, be it, spray foam, corkbark, CocoS panels, whatever, you will need to scuff the surface.
What are the dimensions of this tank?

Cindy Dicken
Vivarium Concepts
www.vivariumconcepts.com
www.rainforesthabitats.com
www.texasdartfrogs.org
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#3
I would experiment, and set up a couple 10 gallon terrariums (super cheap), to get the feel for it, how things start, and how they end up.
The reason I suggest this is because it really sucks to plant a large tank, put frogs in it, and then decide later, that you wish you would have done (x) instead of (y), and then have to tear the tank apart, find places to use as a temporary home for the frogs while you redo the tank, and have buckets and trays of substrate lying around the house while you redo the tank...I'm speaking from experience here, and said tank was only a 40 gallon breeder tank.
Another benifit to the trial tanks, to get a feel for how much the frogs actually eat, crap, etc.
It is also nice to have a couple of unoccupied tanks around "just in case" something starts going wrong with another tank, or if the frogs become hostile towards one another.
Brian T. Sexton
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#4
IMO it's best to start small, the main reason for this is you really wont be able to keep a good eye on the frogs and wont be able to moniter progress or notice any mistakes.

start with a 20 gallon and some Leuc's or Auratus build your confidence with these whilst you build the big tank this way once you feel confident you can keep frogs alive and healthy you should be good to go on the big tank.

as for keeping diferant frogs together do a search on hybrids you will get pages and pages of info.

same species tanks are fine to keep more than one frog in just remember it's a good rule to have atleast 5 gallons per frog. And look at male female aggression IE female tinc's that dont have a good amount of space will fight.
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#5
I think the demensions on the tank are 72" wide 32"deep 30"tall I am going to a pet store right now that has a lot of lizard, frog type stuff to try to get a feel for the cost of making this size of tank what I want it to be. Thanks all for your input, I really do need all I can get. This frog thing is really exciting. Thanks
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#6
I second doing plans on a smaller tank. Ideas in my head sometimes don't flesh out right in larger tanks. It gives you a chance to see how things work out on a small scale and see where you need to make changes. Also, ask around to see come unforseen pitfalls and look at tons of pictures. And most importantly, take a picture journal when you setup the big tank. Good luck.
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