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Communication between frogs and tadpole
#1
We spend tons of time in our frog room and both Jason and I have come to the conclusion that both adult frogs and tadpoles communicate. The communication appears to be visual in nature (movements) and audible (tadpoles making sounds).

We posted a video of our male Alanis transporting tadpoles. When I saw the transport happen, the male Alanis jumped in every pool and waited for the tadpole to detach. Those pools must not have been what the tadpole wanted so the male alanis continued to explore other pools. When he reached the pool containing the other tadpoles and climbed in one of the tadpoles already in the pool swam up and did a distinctive dance in the water. The last tadpole released off the male frogs back and joined the others in the pool. All three tadpole ended up in the same pool.

I have heard imi tadpoles making sounds like a high pitched squeak and doing the same dance as well. I like to observe the frogs at night with a flashlight and this is when I see this behavior.

The imi tadpole rose from the bottom of the film canister as soon as a female frog climbed in. It came to the surface so fast that it breached the surface of the water. The tadpole made a loud ( as loud as an regular imi call!) chirp and did a very interesting dance. The female frog then laid eggs into the film canister for the tadpole to eat.

I would like to hear the experiences of others as well!


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#2
I have not heard tadpoles making noise but I have witnessed my male green Imitator sink to his nose in a brom and start calling real deep. Every time he does this the tadpole will swim around him and come to the surface as if to let him know he is still there. Very interesting.
Garrick H.
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#3
Very interesting stuff guys !
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"Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana".
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#4
Jason has seen this as well! How exciting to know ! The calls of the frogs in the group imi colonies change in both quantity and quality at night as well. The calls change in both frequency and tone at night, becoming less frequent at night. The daytime "Here I am " calls of the males are replaced by chirps and murmurs made by the tadpoles. The strident, high pitched tone of the call now falls to a low, undulating sound with some bass tones.

Sometimes I will hear an unseen tadpole give a loud sqeek. A frog is always close and will come to check on the tadpole.We have also seen groups of 6 or more frogs all hanging out on the back wall of the tank watching a female deposit eggs. This usually happens before 10 PM.


hutch0203 Wrote:I have not heard tadpoles making noise but I have witnessed my male green Imitator sink to his nose in a brom and start calling real deep. Every time he does this the tadpole will swim around him and come to the surface as if to let him know he is still there. Very interesting.
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#5
I have never heard any of the tadpoles my frogs have produced make any noise(R. imitator 'varadero') honestly didn't even know it was possible always thought that the tads had not developed any vocal organs at that point. I have seen the tads splash and wriggle around the tail end of the male and female when they lower into the water. I have also watched the male submerge himself to the point he is completely underwater in the broms and canisters and call. Sounds like he's gurgling, they are short and fast calls. Not sure of what the purpose is of getting so deep into the water, maybe get the tad to get ready for the female to come and drop eggs? I have seen him get into the water but not as deep so it must have some purpose. Although he does not do it every time he goes to the tad or in the water.
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#6
Somebody found this link, but here's a strikingly similar noise as to what I hear in repsonse to male calling while in a deposition cup (for which I have many). The sounds I've hear have been in shorter and lower volume at times, but similar nonetheless.

In my previous fish life (hobby) I kept a picasso trigger fish that when threatened would "shrill" by moving water rapidly through it's gills. Just another thought.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/earth/hi/earth_ne ... 609235.stm
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