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Is this a legal frog?
#1
Seen this on Facebook.....was just curious as to if it is legal and what exactly it is.
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#2
Is there any text surround the pic - what are they saying it is (species ect) and what part of the World are we talking about. Europe, SA or the US ?
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#3
Queens NY and calling it a male "bullseye"
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#4
There were many imports of Oophaga histrionica from Colombia in the mid 90's, to the US. That frog could easily be an offspring from those legal animals or it could have even been brought in from the EU with accompanying paperwork. It looks to be a sub adult as well, so even more credence to it being Captive Born.

'Red Heads' are the most common 'Histo' in US collections followed by 'Bullseye' and then perhaps 'Carmel'.
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"Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana".
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#5
Thanks!
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#6
Theres plenty of anichaya in the hobby too. Lehmani/histo cross?
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#7
Beautiful critters.
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#8
Anchicaya is a cross of lehmanni and red heads. They are a must have for me! Nice pics, thanks for sharing
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#9
Confusedhock: Confusedhock: Confusedhock: Confusedhock: Confusedhock: Confusedhock: By cross...do you mean Hybrid
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#10
No
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#11
Hello Zachaustin.

Yes, the "Anchicaya" it is a natural hybrid arising from yellow lehmanni and the big localities of oophaga histrionica "redhead"

As far as I know, this hybrid comes in two variants, one with white toes/nails and more black pattern on the body like lehmanni. The other one comes with black toes and more red nose and have more yellow pattern as the oophaga histrionica "redhead". Back in time was this frog also known as histrionica/histrionicus "harlequin".
[Image: IMG_0340_zpsc8593693.jpg]
Regards Morten Müller (Denmark)

I did not listen in school, so I must apologize for my Chinese English, I speak it better than I write it
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#12
Forgot to clarify that this hybrid is the size of a fully grown Dendrobates Tinctorius and therefore belongs to the largest species of oophaga.
Regards Morten Müller (Denmark)

I did not listen in school, so I must apologize for my Chinese English, I speak it better than I write it
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#13
So would you keep the hybrids separate from the lemanni or the redheads? If it is a natural hybrid then why not keep all three in the same enclosure?
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#14
From my understanding if it's natural it's not considered a hybrid. Hybrids are man made
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#15
sidney ferrell Wrote:Theres plenty of anichaya in the hobby too. Lehmani/histo cross?

What is the average price of a frog like these? There may be plenty, but purchasing info seems to be the hunt for bigfoot.Lots of pics, but secret locations.
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#16
zachaustin Wrote:So would you keep the hybrids separate from the lemanni or the redheads? If it is a natural hybrid then why not keep all three in the same enclosure?

Hmm. I never thought about this idea, but I understand your intent..

I have heard from other colleagues who have be in the Anchicaya valley that this hybrid live in two different locations, so I would personally not do it.

I have no knowledge to people here in Europe that has the white toes variant in the hobby, maybe it is more prevalent in America ..?
Regards Morten Müller (Denmark)

I did not listen in school, so I must apologize for my Chinese English, I speak it better than I write it
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#17
whitethumb Wrote:From my understanding if it's natural it's not considered a hybrid. Hybrids are man made

Hello whitethumb

So what would you call it when a oophaga lehmanni and a oophaga histrionica make babies, a new species with DNA from both localities ..?

It does not make sense to me, sorry :wink:
Regards Morten Müller (Denmark)

I did not listen in school, so I must apologize for my Chinese English, I speak it better than I write it
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#18
From my understanding, hybrids are not natural in wild populations. If it's natural I would probably call it just that, natural cross.

morten müller Wrote:
whitethumb Wrote:From my understanding if it's natural it's not considered a hybrid. Hybrids are man made

Hello whitethumb

So what would you call it when a oophaga lehmanni and a oophaga histrionica make babies, a new species with DNA from both localities ..?

It does not make sense to me, sorry :wink:
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#19
whitethumb Wrote:From my understanding, hybrids are not natural in wild populations. If it's natural I would probably call it just that, natural cross.

morten müller Wrote:
whitethumb Wrote:From my understanding if it's natural it's not considered a hybrid. Hybrids are man made

Hello whitethumb

So what would you call it when a oophaga lehmanni and a oophaga histrionica make babies, a new species with DNA from both localities ..?

It does not make sense to me, sorry :wink:

Do you refers to "anthropogenic hybridisation", this term is used when people are involved in the process, It is not necessarily the same as intra-species hybridisereing, which is when hybridization is between individuals from different populations and species, so I think it is possible to use "Hybrid" in several different coherence, but perhaps there is a differance between the Danish / American expression ..?!
Regards Morten Müller (Denmark)

I did not listen in school, so I must apologize for my Chinese English, I speak it better than I write it
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#20
Hybridization does occur naturally, I think.

The debate is whether humans have altered the land, thus allowing the breeding to occur or if it is 'natural hybridization'.
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