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Lighting Question - for plants
#1
I have a 15 gal high vivarium with 2 bromeliads and one that I don't know what it is. It had pink little flowers when I bought it and at first started blooming purple flowers out of the pink ones. At that point I had 50/50 power compacts running that were in the spectrum for corals. One of the bulbs busted so I ran to Lowes and picked up a fluorescent fixture and one of the aquarium/ plant bulbs. Since then the plant has started losing color. Is this because there is not enough light or if it is in the wrong spectrum ?

What should I do to fix it ?
Kiki
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#2
THE PLANT U ARE TALKING ABOUT MUST BE A BROMELIAD AND THAT USUALLY HAPPENS WITH THEM THEY DISCOLOR DIE AND THEY LEAVE BEHIND PUPS TO REGROW
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#3
Dear Sirs,

I am new here, this is my first post. I was looking for an answer to my question on other threads, but could not find really one.

My question is how to do the right lighting for self portraits. The problem is that I normally only can paint after work and especially in autumn and winter I need artificial light to do so. My lamp above my easel are very bright 6500K or so daylight lamps. But though these are fine to enlighten my canvas for oil painting and the paper for charcoal, I never get a good lighting on myself in the mirror. There is just too much light direct and reflected, I only have a small room with bright white walls and I do not get nice shadows on my head which bring out the form really well, it all looks very flat and that makes it pretty hard to paint.

Do you know of a tutorial or do you have tips how to achieve the famous "Rembrandt lighting" and still get a nice bright light on the canvas ? How did the masters do this ? Was it their experience so they could create the light out of the imagination, or did they really paint in pretty dark light, like a candle.

The question must sound really stupid, but I dont know better than to ask experienced painters. I tried so many setups for self-portrait and none worked to my satisfaction. With still life I found better ways like building a canopy with black clothing that separates my easel lighting pretty well from the light source of the subject. But when it comes to humans I am the only model available at any time and I am far from good enough to let others pose for me. And I dont like to paint from photographies at all.

Maybe someone has a good idea or a link to a tutorial I thought. All that Google brought up were links to how to set up lights for a self-portrait photography, which were interesting, but you dont have to deal with the reflected light from the easel lighting.

Best regards,
Sascha
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