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Major advantages/disadvantages of different species/feeders?
#1
Is there any specific advantage of any of the different iso species over the others ? In terms of both nutrition, reproduction time, etc? I know there are several species of dwarfs, and the ever-present orange giants, so I figured I'd ask.

The same is true for springtails. They come in a multitude of species as well. Any advantages/disadvantages with any of these?

I mean, obviously the smaller frogs NEED the smaller species, but the larger frogs can handle just about all the species..

Mark
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#2
Springtails: As for tropical and temperate whites, pinks, they keep and reproduce easily and fast. As for blue globular, black tomocerus and blue padura they reproduce at a slower rate and mature slower. They also seem to do better in a drier media.

Isopods: Dwarf whites, striped, and tan are easy to keep and they pretty much just double or triple their numbers monthly. Orange and purples are a bit slower. A well seeded mixed micro fauna viv will prove beneficial for the frogs and the vivs stability. Id say the only springs to avoid with thumbs would be the black tomocerus as the adults can be the size of hydei FF.

Michael
Everyday I meet someone I dislike, are you today's pick? If you dislike me it's because somethings wrong with you!

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#3
Great. Thanks for that. You say to stay away from black tomocerus for thumbs for understandable reasons. Are there any reasons to stay away from specific isopods for, well, any sized frogs ? I know people recommend orange giants namely because of their size. So the frogs won't/can't eat the adults, and they will continue to reproduce. If that's the case with them, are all species of isopods okay for all species of frogs ? It seems like a dumb question and my guess would be that the answer is no, but i don't think ive done enough research to just pass up asking this question.

Mark
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#4
Ive used just about every iso species in my vivs. Orange do make good custodians and the young are as small and white as the dwarfs so they are readily eaten. Tans and the purple natives can be big too but normally take a good while to hit maturity. Still worth tossing a few in the viv.

Michael
Everyday I meet someone I dislike, are you today's pick? If you dislike me it's because somethings wrong with you!

Don't Be A Hybridiot!
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#5
So it really doesn't matter then?

By the way, your avatar is great! What species of frog is that?

Mark
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#6
Mark,

It all boils down to - "How well...how easily....how quickly....do these_____ bugs reproduce" ?

With all microfauna, you want to maintain Several extra cultures of those that you like. For vitattus and similar species, microfauna is not that important at all. I didn't use it for that colony and they are spectacular frogs, I hope you'll agree. Microfauna is really only essential to pumilio, other obligates. Good for thumbnails too.

Nurtrition aside, the many different species of Isopods and Springtails all reproduce / thrive / culture VERY differently.

Some Suck. Some are very profilic. You want the ones that produce well and are "tried and true" in the hobby, otherwise we can just go out in our backyards and jam a fistfull of Isopods and dirt into our vivs and 100% of the bugs...are prolly gonna die. Big difference.
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#7
Quote:It all boils down to - "How well...how easily....how quickly....do these_____ bugs reproduce" ?
The differences in this respect is exactly my question.

I ask purely out of curiosity. I notices that there are so many different species available, and I just wanted to know for future references. Of course I agree that they're a GREAT group of frogs. I absolutely adore them. We get into calling matches quite often as I can mimic their call quite well. It's extremely entertaining!

But all that aside, there were springs in the tank they came from, and I'm thinking about adding more of them and isosceles to take better care of cleaning up a bit. Once I decided that, I started looking and realized there were many more species than I had originally thought. So, I decided to ask out of curiosity. Smile

Mark
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#8
No worries....just want to be sure I was effectively communicating or not. Sometimes a lot can be missed in authoring a post - hard to translate in text as opposed to chatting it up face to face in the frog room.
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