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Regina "twins"
#1
I have found about half a dozen "twin" eggs. None of these have hatched out to have both froglets survive to morphing......until now. I have read that one possibility would be these "twin" eggs are "pushed" together while being laid making them look like two tads in one egg.
Well , two definitions for twins ; two offspring born at the same birth and ; two identical animals, counterparts.
The last may apply to these, the former applies to none as froglets are not born.
Two "twins" with one small head dot , off center to the right, each. One large body dot each. Two small posterior dots each. Hmmm?
My question is this; how identical do these "twins" have to be? I have seen "identical " twins that were fairly easily told apart.
Pics below. I will update them as they mature.
Thoughts?

Rich
Darts with parasites are analogous to mixed tanks, there are no known benefits to the frogs with either.


If tone is more important to you than content, you are at the wrong place.

My new email address is: rich.frye@icloud.com and new phone number is 773 577 3476
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#2
Rich,

Looks like these are no more twins then are the rest of the frogs from any clutch. They do not appear to be identical (exact DNA) since they have different patterns on them, unless this pattern is influenced by environment, which doesnt seem too likely. It seems like maybe the eggs could have grown together in some way but the DNA of each frog seems different.

Mike
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#3
Toe clippings it is.
Rich
Darts with parasites are analogous to mixed tanks, there are no known benefits to the frogs with either.


If tone is more important to you than content, you are at the wrong place.

My new email address is: rich.frye@icloud.com and new phone number is 773 577 3476
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#4
One other thing.
It is not usual to get two clutch mates morph with a right off-center head spot, one large back spot and two post spots . The odds of that happening are really not great. I have morphed out quite a number of these guys.
Rich
Darts with parasites are analogous to mixed tanks, there are no known benefits to the frogs with either.


If tone is more important to you than content, you are at the wrong place.

My new email address is: rich.frye@icloud.com and new phone number is 773 577 3476
Like Reply
#5
I think that exact coloration could be linked to dietary specifics in some cases. Obviously with things like paprika you can get brighter or whatnot, but maybe since patterns change(during tad and froglet phase) with time dietary factors could play a role. I would not rule these guys out as twins, and think with their complete morph you can be a little more positive, plus the with toe clipping (as seen on frognet) you could be sure. ps. Love the darklands.
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#6
I would agree that external variables do effect color, and to some extent pattern, but there has to be a certain amount of genetic info that is predetermined before morphing. I just find it interesting that two clutchmates or "twins" would have very similar markings . I do expect pattern and color to change when maturing. It will be interesting to see just how much these two look alike when mature.
I am looking for anyone with the ability to work with toe clippings (or tail clippings , if facilities are found soon enough) for genetic work up.
Darts with parasites are analogous to mixed tanks, there are no known benefits to the frogs with either.


If tone is more important to you than content, you are at the wrong place.

My new email address is: rich.frye@icloud.com and new phone number is 773 577 3476
Like Reply
#7
Rich I think there would be considerable cost in trying to sequence out the DNA. There most likely would not be many focus that would be different since they are already basically twins. I dont think diet will affect the pattern of spots but I am sure it will affect the color.

Mike
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#8
Hey Mike,
I agree that the color, not the pattern (mainly) would/can be effected externally. So again, I am just interested that these two that hatched from the same egg are so close in appearance, if they are not twins. I have been told that you can not tell if they are twins by looking at them. It is some coincidence, no??
Also, this has come up more than once. I would think that someone out there would be interested in doing a study to find out if these type hatches are twins or not. I have clippings to burn!!



Rich
Darts with parasites are analogous to mixed tanks, there are no known benefits to the frogs with either.


If tone is more important to you than content, you are at the wrong place.

My new email address is: rich.frye@icloud.com and new phone number is 773 577 3476
Like Reply




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