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'Sky Blue" Azureus - Dendrobates tinctorious
#1
I'm going to start "reporting" on a lot of my old Reptile Magazines from the past 10-20 years and posting some Dart Frog related snippits.

From "Reptile Hobbyist" September 1998, author Jack Wattley

"I have been fortunate to observe all three color forms of D. azureus. The most common form is medium blue with blackish spots. I have also seen a few specimens that were nearly solid blue in color, as well as three frogs that were a very light bluish green in shade".

That last description seems to be a "Green Sip" or Sipaliwini Savanna animal that we are familiar with, now 13 years later.

But the second description seems to allude to what we know in the Hobby to now be called - The "Sky Blue" azureus. There has been some speculation that this morph was a purely hobby created, or line-bred animal, but this article seems to counter that theory. I doubt that azureus were line bred back in 1998, but I could be wrong. I know that Sean Stewart has a couple breeding groups of these and has produced many offspring.
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#2
Phil most of the azzies(i repeat most) here seem to come from one breeder. I have located 2 lines that can only be traced as far as holland,I believe one throws darker and is darker in colour,than the second line. I thought we had a safe 2 unrelated lines that would be able to be inter/breed, now I am back to being confused,as your above post points to there being separate populations,I guess its back to the old collection data AGAIN. I understand how important it is to not cross breed morphs,but am getting close to being mystified as to how to achieve this. I believed untill now there was only one form of azzie, I am constantly finding info that contradicts what i though was correct,but all is unfounded with out collection data,that i cannot yet source.(very off topic but totally related my distant bastis seem to be more straight foward now than these beginner frogs)
Stu
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#3
Does the article say he observed them seperately or within a group? If they were seperate groups, does he say how far apart the groups were located and/or if there was the possibility that these groups were once related and just split populations of the original group?
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#4
No...the article does not go into further detail.
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"Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana".
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#5
That's too bad. That would have been interesting information.
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#6
Yeah it was a short article. I have several different Reptile type magazines going back to the 80's. I'm going to start mining them for all the dart frog articles but actual "history" type info is always hard to come by. More's the pity.
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"Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana".
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#7
To bump....these "all blue" azureus are a naturally occuring colour morph / population that a few breeders keep going but do not keep "back crossing" them for selective breeding ?

Anyone know if that's correct ?
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"Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana".
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#8
You guys mean Okopipi?



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

From the
American Dendrobatid Group Newsletter No. 17 September -October 1994


"Last summer my son and I went down to the Brazil/Surinam border and with the help of the local Akuriyo Indains were able to bring back a number of frogs, mainly D. tintorius and D. azureus. We now have young from these frogs. it was interesting that in the area where we found frogs in Brazil , known as the Sipaliwini Savannah , the ambient temperature was approximately 85 degrees F (30 C) . In this area we found three color forms of D. azureus. Most were the regular blue with black spots, but others were completely blue , while others were much lighter blue/green in the forward area of the back. "
Jack H. Wattley




It would seem that "in this area" (in Brazil) implies that it was one breeding population , with "nearly solid blue/completely blue" and "lighter blue-green". But this area could be all of Brazil, for all we know.
What is not implied is the fact he saw much less of the solids than spotted azureus. "Most were the regular blue with black spots" , a "few solid".
Few = $$$= selective breeding.
Darts with parasites are analogous to mixed tanks, there are no known benefits to the frogs with either.


If tone is more important to you than content, you are at the wrong place.

My new email address is: rich.frye@icloud.com and new phone number is 773 577 3476
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#9
There is an interesting write up from Ron Gagliardo back in ADG # 34 , Oct-Dec of 1997. He alludes to a few things not covered by Jack.
It's way to long for me to re-type and I don't have a scanner, so Chuck P. may be in need of solicitation of his treasure trove of newletters. Great reads.

Rich
Darts with parasites are analogous to mixed tanks, there are no known benefits to the frogs with either.


If tone is more important to you than content, you are at the wrong place.

My new email address is: rich.frye@icloud.com and new phone number is 773 577 3476
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#10
I have that issue too Rich...I'll PM Chuck and ask him for permission to re-post ADG stuff here.
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"Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana".
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#11
FYI - I also have a complete set of ADG newsletters that I purchased from Chuck. PM if any ques or ref needed to an issue.

-Scott
Scott - North Dallas
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#12
One of my good fish buddies who is also now into darts was a friend of Jack Wattley. I believe he even had Jack over at his house when he would come into town. I'm gonna ask him about this and see if Jack ever mentioned anything to him.
Jon
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#13
Stupid question, I'm sure, but is that the same Jack Wattley that did discus?
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#14
The one and the same Chuck.
Jon
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#15
Interesting. Never knew he did frogs, too.
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#16
Friends and business partners , to some extent at one time, with Bill Samples.
Darts with parasites are analogous to mixed tanks, there are no known benefits to the frogs with either.


If tone is more important to you than content, you are at the wrong place.

My new email address is: rich.frye@icloud.com and new phone number is 773 577 3476
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#17
Jon....your avatar pic....why? ...lol......and that's onehelluva big soul patch farm ya got going on there.
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#18
RichFrye Wrote:Friends and business partners , to some extent at one time, with Bill Samples.

Indeed. Both Sudfloridians.
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"Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana".
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#19
Philsuma Wrote:Jon....your avatar pic....why? ...lol......and that's onehelluva big soul patch farm ya got going on there.

Am I scaring off forum members? lol
Jon
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#20
Nah...you just got more of a 'Billy Ray Cyrus patch' going on than I do right now...lol
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