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Two Florida Species Declared Extinct
#1
Not frogs but close enough......very sad because it was so incredibly preventable.

Two Florida Species Declared Extinct - Endangered Species Review Too Late to Save South Florida Rainbow Snake, Florida Fairy Shrimp

Press Release - Center for Biological Diversity- 10/5/11 Jacksonville, FL.— The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced today that two Florida species, the South Florida rainbow snake and the Florida fairy shrimp, have been determined to be extinct. The finding came in response to a petition filed by the Center for Biological Diversity in 2010 seeking Endangered Species Act protection for the rainbow snake, fairy shrimp and more than 400 aquatic species in the southeastern United States. Last week the Service announced that 374 other freshwater species in the petition, including 114 in Florida, may warrant protection under Act. All of those species will now get an in-depth review.

“It’s heart-wrenching to learn that these two unique Florida species have been lost forever. Like most species that go extinct, these two were not protected under the Endangered Species Act, which is the most powerful tool we have for saving our nation’s plants and animals from disappearing,” said Tierra Curry, a conservation biologist with the Center.

The South Florida rainbow snake was known only from Fish Eating Creek, which flows into the west side of Lake Okeechobee. The beautiful snake was iridescent bluish-black with red stripes on its back and sides, red and yellow patches on its belly and throat, and a yellow chin. Adults were more than four feet long. It was last seen in 1952.

The Florida fairy shrimp was known from a single pond just south of Gainesville. The pond was destroyed by development, and the species hasn't been detected elsewhere.

“The government has to determine quickly whether the 114 other Florida species it’s reviewing will get protection so that more of Florida’s heritage isn't erased by extinction,” said Curry. “The well being of human society is deeply linked to the health of the natural systems we need to sustain life. In the end, saving species will help save us.”

The southeastern United States is home to more unique species of freshwater animals than anywhere else in the world, including mussels, snails and crayfish. Tragically, many of the region’s animals have already been lost to extinction.

Contact: Tierra Curry, (928) 522-3681
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"Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana".
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#2
very sad to hear. especially when they were both only fromm individual locales. i'm always amazed what developers are allowed to do all because of the almighty buck that goes into pockets due to taxes collected on all those new developments.

when the loss of two very rare animals can be traced to development and loss of habitat and that doesn't make a difference its sad.

I always shake my head in my town when you have to ask to cut a dead tree down over 4 inches in diameter but a developer can harvest hundreds of acres in a new development, leave no trees in an entire development and nothing is said to them. something wrong with the rules for developers in my opinion.it is clearly the money the county makes from the builder. all about money. sorry i got off track.

it is a plain shame they weren't on the threatened list before extinct. very very sad to hear.thanks for the post.
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#3
So again as I have said, developement in Florida is insane. On another note I spent a lot of time herping at Fisheating creek in the 80's. It was home to the nicest Yellow Ratsnakes I have ever seen, crisp , bright, banana yellow,as well as Silver with Red saddles Corn snakes, Used to be a herp filled area, now, occasional Moccasin, not much else, sad.
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#4
Bill Schwinn Wrote:So again as I have said, developement in Florida is insane. On another note I spent a lot of time herping at Fisheating creek in the 80's. It was home to the nicest Yellow Ratsnakes I have ever seen, crisp , bright, banana yellow,as well as Silver with Red saddles Corn snakes, Used to be a herp filled area, now, occasional Moccasin, not much else, sad.

yeah bill,

i lived in central florida for a little while a few years back and i saw more snakes in my residential neighborhood in yards than i did in the wild due to the overdeveloping, cookie cutter communities being slapped together in record time especially between 2004-2006. very sad what development can do to the entire ecosystem and how fast it can happen.same thing for archeological sites. imagine how many are ignored by some developers due to possible delay or even being shut down and denied the go ahead? they can't have that. it definitely happens and gets buried over without the scientific community knowing about the site. all about money.
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#5
That is too bad. Florida has so many unique habitats and its sad to see some many species pushed to the limits. There is so much open land in Florida also...
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