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heating and humidity ?
#1
I'd love some input from you guys on what's the best way to get the temps perfect and how to create the right humidity. I've owned chameleons and used heating lamps and misted them to get everything right with them.
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#2
TonyI25 Wrote:I'd love some input from you guys on what's the best way to get the temps perfect and how to create the right humidity. I've owned chameleons and used heating lamps and misted them to get everything right with them.

Some good averages or a good baseline for most species:

Good Temperatures:

Highs - high 70's F
Lows - low 70's to high 60'sF

in other words, average household temps are good. AVOID temps of 80F and higher and be careful of heat thrown off by hot lights.

Humidity - 75% is a decent number. 80% is good too.

Make sure you have a COVERED top/ lid. Glass is best.
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#3
Chances are you'll have a harder time keeping them cool, rather than warm.


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Jon
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#4
Just like they said already, keeping it cool will probably the hardest part. Easiest way is to keep the ambient (house) temperature around mid 70's. Misting is the easiest way to keep the humidity up too. Good luck!
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#5
So a heating bulb is not needed? When i had chameleons they needed it. Would a fogger really help or is it not necessary?
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#6
Nope, you won't need a heating bulb. Fogger's aren't necessary but some of the plants can benefit from it. But I wouldn't recommend an in tank fogger, some of the ones for home use can be modified to pump in fog easily and cheaply. There are a couple threads here on them.
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#7
You absolutely don't need a heating bulb. Not even in winter. A fogger isn't necessary either, just a little hand mister. It could be as inexpensive as a little $1 hand mister.


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#8
I have a big spray bottle that I spray with once or twice a day.
Backgrounds of some kind lining the sides and back should help keep the temps stable.
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#9
be careful with fans. They can easily dry things out too much and you will quickly go from too wet to too dry.

Passive air ventilation is primary. Don't equate air *movement* with ventilation.

More importantly, is that the frogs have @ 1/2 of the 'floorspace' or footprint to be dry. We usually cover about that much area with dry leaf litter - like small live oak leaves and magnolia leaves which are waxy and resist getting damp and rotting apart like oak and other softer leaves.

You never want the frogs to be confined to wetness. People often confuse these guys with North American animals like Bullfrogs ect, that live in the wet.

Dart frogs are often found walking or 'hanging out' on completely dry surfaces.

This is why you need to be careful with fans ect. A delicate balance of decent humidity - 70-80% with occasional misting but not true wetness needs to be achieved.
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