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Do ONLY female tincs fight?
#1
Ive had a female cobalt for a while now and she is very dominant. She was the "alpha" of a trio of females and shes been alone for a few months.
I finally found her a boy ( what i thought to be a boy ) and put him in a tank. Because she was so dominant i let the boy feel out his new home a few days then i moved her into his tank. She immediately started jumping on him and got him in a headlock. This was seriously funny and crazy to witness so i obviously seperated them. Im 99% she is a girl and i was pretty certain i had chosen a boy from the local breeder but we didnt feel 100% confident. So my question is: is the boy a girl because ive only ever heard of girls beings crazy territorial fighters. Have any of you witnessed males tincs fight?
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#2
On a side note. How in the hell does she know its a girl, Smell? Its for damn sure not the physical attributes because i was like 80% it was a boy based off size and body shape. Toe pads werent that large though so thats what threw us off.
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#3
"Headlocks "- sounds like two females to me.
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"Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana".
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#4
Yea i thought so. Im just wondering if adult males will fight as well. Unfortunately im flooded with girls and no boys lol
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#5
Males will fight too, but don't seem to be nearly as aggressive as the females. Female on male aggression can happen as well. Females dominate the tank IMO even in male heavy groups.

I'd like to see a pic of this frog you think is male. It's possible that it could be.
Glenn
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#6
frogfreak Wrote:Female on male aggression can happen as well. Females dominate the tank IMO even in male heavy groups..

Yep, especially so if it's an tank that the female has had time to get established and territorial about before introducing any other frogs.
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#7
Boondoggle Wrote:
frogfreak Wrote:Female on male aggression can happen as well. Females dominate the tank IMO even in male heavy groups..

Yep, especially so if it's an tank that the female has had time to get established and territorial about before introducing any other frogs.

Good point. I would pull all the frogs and mix things up a bit. Them add them all back into the tank at the same time.
Glenn
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#8
Thanks guys. Im gonna make a new tank and try once again. I'll keep you guys posted. Ill also take some pics of both for comparison.
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#9
A new tank should work even better than shuffling the old tank. Apparently they respond to olfactory ques as well when it comes to territory. Keep in mind, too, some females are just bigger bullies than others. I have a female galact that just kicks everybody's butt in the tank no matter what I do.
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#10
I agree. I have a female Alanis and man she makes feeding time interesting, especially when cycling them down.
Glenn
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#11
this is slightly off topic but makes for an interesting observation as to the factors governing our dart frog behaviour.In the last few days i have witnessed outbreaks of scrapping,i've also noted (relevent) a post here uk about male tincs suddenly starting fighting big style, even though they have been long term breeding companions,the curious thing to me is we are huge distances apart and yet i'm noting frog behaviour questions comming to light here and over there,across species, at the same time.....initially i thought co incidence,now I'm really not so sure,i'm seeing it way to often.
The joy of international interweb
Stu

Ps Glen that simple statement means so so much to me,especially in my first year and in my case with auratus
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#12
Hey Stu,

Are you cycling the frogs down right now?
Glenn
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#13
frogfreak Wrote:Hey Stu,

Are you cycling the frogs down right now?
hey Glen,
yes mate well some of them that have been breeding long enough in my eyes trouble is as one builds a collection everything is out of kilter at first,but have been trying for ages to stop 2 groups,have slowed them massively for a good while but still seeing eggs,i'm wrestling with this mate everything else,i'm starting !! to get a grip on,maybe raise the bar on springs
Stu
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#14
This is when we see the most aggression, Stu. They are competing for food. Did you reduce the misting and drop the humidity levels? They should retreat to a hole, under a chunk of wood, under leaf litter, etc. They need to know it's the dry season and their behavior should change. I need a break as much as the frogs. :lol:

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Glenn
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#15
and if the fighting seems to be everyday and they won't stop....permanent separation may be in order. Some frogs do seem to have certain personalities and will never "get along" with another frog.
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#16
frogfreak Wrote:This is when we see the most aggression, Stu. They are competing for food. Did you reduce the misting and drop the humidity levels? They should retreat to a hole, under a chunk of wood, under leaf litter, etc. They need to know it's the dry season and their behavior should change. I need a break as much as the frogs. :lol:

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Thats cool mate,i was talking to someone here on our little forum and that was my thoery exactly,i'm barking up the right tree.
Misting has been gradually reduced more and more and more same with feeding, but a constant supply of water for rehydration is ALWAYS available,its like a desert in the mystie tank Glen i'm just keeping the plants alive,but they are not reteating at all just follow us as we do chores begging to be fed.
Getting this bang on is my biggest challenge so far i think,its abit scarey for a novice doing this,possibly we've been abit too gradual,in this but hell i'm learning so so much so fast one can see an air of caution being used
thanks as always mate
Stu
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