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Lava Rock a thought, and a idea maybe!?
#1
Greetings.

- Backstory: I was in my storage room the other day where I keep equip. and stuff for aquariums. And "frogging"...
I stumbled upon 4 bags of black lava from Hawaii, for use in reeftanks. And it got me thinking, could "regular" lava serve beneficial in adding minerals and trace elements. At the same time it serve purpose for draining instead of using LECA?

I am in line of thought as "tea water" is beneficial... Maybe?


Flemming.
Flemming, Denmark.

http://www.regnskoven.dk/en/nature-cons ... de-sumaco/
(In English, about conservancy in Ecuador)
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#2
I've used lava rock as drainage in vivs before and it works fine(though it was the mexican red...not sure about the density/porousness of the black). Make sure you wash it really well to remove any salt residue. I still use lava as the drainage layer in my plants grow out tanks, much cheaper than hydroton.
-Field Smith
Some frogs...
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#3
Thank you for your fast reply!

- Now, I was not planning to use this black lava... I believe its minerals and trace elements to have been washed out as it was collected at the sea. (Bought as "live sand")
It was only source for inspiration, and I would use that brownish red one... (Where I live, I think the lave might have been collected on Iceland. Just as a sidenote!)

In Denmark where I come from, leca is cheaper than lava... It was the mineral and trace element content I was after as being beneficial, maybe.
- Thank you for your reply. I will go for the lava then!
(if the mineral content will not prove beneficial, it sure will not do any harm.) :wink:

Flemming.
Flemming, Denmark.

http://www.regnskoven.dk/en/nature-cons ... de-sumaco/
(In English, about conservancy in Ecuador)
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#4
In the U.S, we mainly have access to the red "lava" rock or pumice. It is very light and can absolutely be used in place of leca / hydroton as it's very light. It would also help keep the substrate in an "aerobic" state, with pockets of open space for micro fauna to flourish.

[Image: lava-rock-landscaping.jpg]

It is kinda $$$ here and as such, not many hobbyists that I know, employ it.

If it were cleaned, I'd say go for it. The salt concern is more for plants, but I see plants actually grown in and around the rock so I don't think that would be much of an issue.

Keep researching and experimenting with it - let us know how you make out !
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"Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana".
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#5
Aye, yes. Thank you for your inputs, I will!

- Good one there by you:
"It would also help keep the substrate in an "aerobic" state, with pockets of open space for micro fauna to flourish."
End quote.
Yes, of course. You are right! (That one might even be better than clay...!)

Flemming.
Flemming, Denmark.

http://www.regnskoven.dk/en/nature-cons ... de-sumaco/
(In English, about conservancy in Ecuador)
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#6
Just a side note my wife is from Denmark and i love that place it is awsome.....Bevar Christiania.....
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#7
shrum Wrote:Just a side note my wife is from Denmark and i love that place it is awsome.....Bevar Christiania.....

- You can buy Christania stocks now... (!) Did you know?? :lol:

Denmark is a nice and very small country, thank you!
- Say Hello to your wife from Denmark! :wink:
Flemming, Denmark.

http://www.regnskoven.dk/en/nature-cons ... de-sumaco/
(In English, about conservancy in Ecuador)
Reply




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