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R. sirensis Panguana Orange
#1
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Here is another clutch from these egg suspenders... They will suspend the eggs if given the option. The glass bottle they used as a deposition site doubles as a tad receptacle as well. It is a 2 oz. glass bottle that was a cocktail sauce bottle. I am quite thrifty, and always look to utilize old jars, etc. like this. It has served me and my frogs quite well.

JBear
JBear

"A fool thinks himself to be wise; A wise man knows himself to be a fool"

R. sirensis-P. terribilis-P. bicolor-E. anthonyi
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#2
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Another pic... The flash distorted the color of the embryo...

JBear
JBear

"A fool thinks himself to be wise; A wise man knows himself to be a fool"

R. sirensis-P. terribilis-P. bicolor-E. anthonyi
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#3
Pretty interesting...a glass bottle used for both egg deposition and tadpole rearing. Like it.
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"Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana".
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#4
Here is a tad recovered today(not from the clutch of eggs pictured).

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JBear
JBear

"A fool thinks himself to be wise; A wise man knows himself to be a fool"

R. sirensis-P. terribilis-P. bicolor-E. anthonyi
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#5
In regards to the egg clutch above, the tad that is further along is already moving and changing it's orientation within the egg capsule. Hard as I tried, I could not get the camera to focus on it as the flash was blotting out the target. Will try again without flash in daylight hours.

JBear
JBear

"A fool thinks himself to be wise; A wise man knows himself to be a fool"

R. sirensis-P. terribilis-P. bicolor-E. anthonyi
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#6
So, I guess baby food jars would work well with this. In a couple more months, I'll have tons of them. Love the recycling!
Jon
1.0.6 D. Leucomelas
0.0.2 D. Azureus
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#7
Yes they will work great! Just tilt the jar ever so slightly and allow a small pool of water to rest in the bottom. This will benefit the humidity, and also, if the tad hatches before "dad" gets there, there is a bit of a safe haven until the tad is recovered and taken to a more suitable pool of water. If you have enough extra jars and space, I would lay one directly on it"s side, position one at a 45 degree angle, and position one absolutely vertical with a substantial water reserve in it. Best of luck!

JBear
JBear

"A fool thinks himself to be wise; A wise man knows himself to be a fool"

R. sirensis-P. terribilis-P. bicolor-E. anthonyi
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#8
Less than a day after deposition, the male is hauling another tad... I couldn't be happier. The only "drag" I can see is that we are heading into summer months and I fear I won't be able to cycle the female out of breeding mode without the removal/seperation of the male(s). All I want is my adult trio, so I don't want to burn her, or him out. I am considering going to a very well vented top to allow the humidity to subside drastically, and also allow some better evaporative cooling. My backroom/frogroom gets HOT in summer, and glass tops will magnify this effect... Any thoughts? Thanks!

JBear
JBear

"A fool thinks himself to be wise; A wise man knows himself to be a fool"

R. sirensis-P. terribilis-P. bicolor-E. anthonyi
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#9
That tad was deposited today(thank goodness not another week long ride-lol). Here is a pic that demonstrates the size of the newly hatched R. sirensis tads. The FFs in the water(dead) are D. melanogaster.

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JBear
JBear

"A fool thinks himself to be wise; A wise man knows himself to be a fool"

R. sirensis-P. terribilis-P. bicolor-E. anthonyi
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#10
Great pic ! Wow...tiny.
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"Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana".
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#11
Yes, quite tiny! And, in my experience, they are quite hardy too! These frogs are an absolute joy to work with. Lovely call, visible, active, and strikingly beautiful! If anyone is interested in working with these gems, PM me, I would be glad to help!
JBear

"A fool thinks himself to be wise; A wise man knows himself to be a fool"

R. sirensis-P. terribilis-P. bicolor-E. anthonyi
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#12
Wow J those guys are small. It looks like it's what 3 times the length of a fruit fly? What are you feeding them? Do you know how to make green water? That might help feeding such tiny tads.
Jon
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#13
yeah really.....an almond leaf in each tad cup would be good too - for the biofilm and grazing.
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"Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana".
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#14
Micro worms would be a good feeder for tads that small.
Jon
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#15
I have softened oak leaves that they graze on, and also tad bites that I break into tiny pieces. Wouldn't mind you sharing the green water technique though! I have frozen bloodworms etc, but I have not offered them.

They don't really eat for the first couple of days, but growth is rapid. The R. sirensis tads quickly outgrow E. anthonyi tads. After about a month they start to get orange noses and soon after that the back legs start to emerge.
JBear

"A fool thinks himself to be wise; A wise man knows himself to be a fool"

R. sirensis-P. terribilis-P. bicolor-E. anthonyi
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#16
Green water is really easy to make. These are old school foods that old school fish keepers used to culture when they had really small fry. Take a large clear jar, mason jar or old mayo jar will work. Fill it up with tap water and let it age for a couple of days to let all the chlorine dissipate. Then add a piece of lettuce. Romaine, Iceberg, doesn't matter. Set it in a window where it will get plenty of sun. Wait about 7-12 days depending how much light it gets and you should see infusoria and other stuff in there. Now if those are too small for the tad to eat, try and find a culture of daphnia and start culturing that. Daphnia is an excellent live food and it eats the green water, so you'll already have a supply of that. Another good one is microworms. I cultured them once, don't have a lot of experience with them. They are small though. About a third or a quarter the size of a ff maggot.
Jon
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#17
Sounds like you have a feeding plan already, but if you wanted more info on small live food...
I cultured microworms when I bred bettas. If it helps as a size reference, the betta fry are only about 3 mm when they become free swimming. They start out on the things mentioned, daphnia, rotifers, & green water items. As they get to about 4-6 mm they handle the microworms and vinegar eels just fine.
(edited to add) Easy to culture, and produce a lot of food.
Lisa
In central NY

R. Imitator 'Cainarachi Valley' 2.3.0
R. Imitator 'Cainarachi Valley' Froglets 8 and counting.
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