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'Paru' Oophaga sylvatica - PICS !
#1
They finally came in today! Very amazing frogs in all aspects. The colors and patterns are crazy and they have a lot of interesting behaviors.

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Adam Hess
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#2
Love them !

Three cheers for the Peppers !!!
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"Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana".
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#3
Incredible! love the variation. the last one is my favorite.
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#4
Lookin awesome Adam!
-Field Smith
Some frogs...
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#5
Thanks guys! Ya Mark really out did himself with these.
Adam Hess
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#6
Great photos! Congratulations!
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#7
anyone know the prices, per, for this shipment ?
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"Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana".
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#8
$500/per
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#9
Wow Adam amazing frogs! I still cant get over the variability of these.. I posted pictures in the other "Paru" thread but ill post them here too!
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#10
Yeah, these are 100% a mixture of Lita and San Lorenzo
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#11
when you say, a mixture Chris....you are saying the SHIPMENT contains specimens from both Populations, correct ?

Not that many of the individual animals look like a CROSS between or containing elements of Both populations.
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"Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana".
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#12
^ Option #2, with some looking way more like one or the other. I can post pics later of some of my Litas and San Lorenzos that look a lot like some of these.
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#13
interesting....Do these imports have locale (GPS) data ?
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"Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana".
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#14
Those are some nice looking frogs! Definitely a lot of variation.

Phil, this population is inbetween the San Lorenzo and Lita populations and represents a natural crossing of them. I would assume they have GPS data since Wikiri is farming them in situ.
Adam Hess
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#15
OK Litas, then San Lorenzos (most of these are probably on here in other threads already)

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#16
ChrisK Wrote:^ Option #2, with some looking way more like one or the other. I can post pics later of some of my Litas and San Lorenzos that look a lot like some of these.


Chris you infer they took 2 populations and put them together in the program, mixing 2 morphs to create these offspring. I believe when the announcement was made that these were going to be available it was said that these come from an area where perhaps the 2 populations naturally occurred, creating a population unto themselves....a mixture or a unique morph where populations come together.
I would ask what you know of these animals?
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#17
markpulawski Wrote:
ChrisK Wrote:^ Option #2, with some looking way more like one or the other. I can post pics later of some of my Litas and San Lorenzos that look a lot like some of these.


Chris you infer they took 2 populations and put them together in the program, mixing 2 morphs to create these offspring. I believe when the announcement was made that these were going to be available it was said that these come from an area where perhaps the 2 populations naturally occurred, creating a population unto themselves....a mixture or a unique morph where populations come together.
I would ask what you know of these animals?
No I'm being misunderstood, I don't know anything anyone else does - I also think they are what you mentioned ^ I'm just showing how individuals have more characteristics of one or the other.
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#18
ChrisK Wrote:
markpulawski Wrote:
ChrisK Wrote:^ Option #2, with some looking way more like one or the other. I can post pics later of some of my Litas and San Lorenzos that look a lot like some of these.


Chris you infer they took 2 populations and put them together in the program, mixing 2 morphs to create these offspring. I believe when the announcement was made that these were going to be available it was said that these come from an area where perhaps the 2 populations naturally occurred, creating a population unto themselves....a mixture or a unique morph where populations come together.
I would ask what you know of these animals?
No I'm being misunderstood, I don't know anything anyone else does - I also think they are what you mentioned ^ I'm just showing how individuals have more characteristics of one or the other.

This is Mark Pepper's explanation of the cross:

This represents years of work and a monumental effort by WIKIRI and some pretty world renown Ecuadorian biologists to make this happen.

Historically the entirety of the Ecuadorian Choco would have enjoyed sylvatica distribution, with one population naturally running into another in many places, probably a slow transition from morph to morph throughout much of Esmeraldas, Imabaru, Carachi and into Colombia.

Geographically, Alto Tambo and the Otokiki reserve where these "Paru" frogs originate is situated between Lita which is located to the south east and San Lorenzo to North west. The hobby is long familiar with both frogs from near Lita, and those from near San Lorenzo. These Paru frogs, naturally are variable and express some morphological traits from both of these aforementioned neighboring populations. This is to be expected as there is no major naturally geography to isolate these populations. Resource extraction, in many forms has resulted in the isolation and reduction of many populations and ranges, but this is a rather recent phenomenon.

Most of these frogs are red/orange to caramel base colour with some hints of yellow spotting on the dorsum. A few lack the spotting and are more uniform in colour, while others have more pronounced spotting. The situation here is no different than what is often seen with pumilio from Isla Bastimentos, the Red and Blue Escudo situation, or variability that is naturally present in many Dendrobatid populations. These are not hybrids between two distinct species as is the case with lehmanii and histrionica hybrids.

WIKIRI is working on a much more detailed informational release, which will in much more detail summarize their work, the conservation, research, and educational work that will benefit from the export of these frogs. As soon as that is ready, we will publish it online.

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#19
ChrisK Wrote:
markpulawski Wrote:
ChrisK Wrote:^ Option #2, with some looking way more like one or the other. I can post pics later of some of my Litas and San Lorenzos that look a lot like some of these.


Chris you infer they took 2 populations and put them together in the program, mixing 2 morphs to create these offspring. I believe when the announcement was made that these were going to be available it was said that these come from an area where perhaps the 2 populations naturally occurred, creating a population unto themselves....a mixture or a unique morph where populations come together.
I would ask what you know of these animals?
No I'm being misunderstood, I don't know anything anyone else does - I also think they are what you mentioned ^ I'm just showing how individuals have more characteristics of one or the other.

Thanks Chris I misunderstood what you were getting at, I thought maybe you had heard something from across the pond.
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#20
I found this while looking for more sylvaticus info today, pretty interesting to see the variability of the contributing populations that make up 'Paru'.

http://www.dendrobase.de/?gattung=Oopha ... a&id=12220
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