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Egg shells for Springtails and Isopods = Calcium
#1
Yep...a great source of Calcium and easily digested by the little suckers.

I microwave the shells and then brake them up a little and then into the cx containers they go !
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"Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana".
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#2
Phil, how much are you breaking up the shells? I was told elsewhere that it has to be very small pieces almost powdered so they're able to ingest them. From my limited research on iso's is that they're able to nibble off the outsides breaking it down into smaller pieces for themselves.
Jon
1.0.6 D. Leucomelas
0.0.2 D. Azureus
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#3
You can break them up small or not. You'll be surprised how well they will take care of the shells. I think they reduce the shell little by little -starting with the albumin and then finally reducing the shell. It may take a long time depending on the size and age of your insect colony.

Also...take a look how quickly an active Isopod colony can make short work of a couple pieces of double correlated cardboard.
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"Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana".
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#4
I've only got 5 adults and maybe 2-3 babies I've seen. I had them in a pretty big container so got advice to put them in a much smaller container so they're able to find each other easier. I routed through the culture and found the few I started with and a couple extras. For substrate I'm using shredded corrugation from a craft store that's moist mixed with shredded live oak leaves. Feeding fish flakes every few days but after a month not seeing the explosion that others have seen using the same method. I'm thinking of transferring them into some eco earth and see how that works.

As for the egg shell, I microwaved it like you did and squeezed it 3 or 4 times and got some fairly small pieces.
Jon
1.0.6 D. Leucomelas
0.0.2 D. Azureus
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#5
depending on the isopod species...it may take a while before your cx is kicking ass and cranking. Some of my small cx's can take up to 4-6 months even. The only feeder insect that is 'quick' to produce is FF and I think we all get spoiled by them and think that all of out feeders should 'explode' in no time.

Even Springtails can take several weeks to months to really get going.
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"Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana".
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#6
Yeah, mine are dwarf greys. I got 5 free with some other stuff I ordered. Now to find some springs I'm not going to pay more for shipping than the culture.
Jon
1.0.6 D. Leucomelas
0.0.2 D. Azureus
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#7
We use these aswell Phil seems to work well!! Apparently cutllefish bone is another good potential Ca source,not tried it yet though...we keep ducks so waste not want not :lol:
Stu
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#8
We've found that using a coffee grinder breaks down the shells really well.
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#9
I have definitely considered this, any risks with salmonella?
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#10
Microwaving the shells would take care of that Craig....I would think.

but then, maybe they wouldn't be as tasty to the isos when the albumen is gone...
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"Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana".
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#11
I put the egg shell in a coffee bean grinder and turn them into a very fine powder that I mix with other foods.
Multi cereals for babies, corn, peas, rice, beans, lentils, fish flakes, spirulina flakes.
My sprintails love it!

No document to prove it but I would also say (as Phil) that it is a pretty good way to add Ca to your feeders. Wink


K.
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