Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Willams blue cave gecko anywhere ?
#1
Does anyone know a place these geckos can be acquired ?
Reply
#2
Junter1111 Wrote:Does anyone know a place these geckos can be acquired

last I heard these guys were on wait lists
Reply
#3
Yea I'm hoping somebody Is breeding them
Reply
#4
There are a few of us working with the species, but unfortunately at the moment demand far outstrips supply
Reply
#5
Aren't these the little Tanzanian guys that flooded in about 4 years ago....$20.00 each. Lots of red ticks on them ?
https://www.facebook.com/dartden/

https://twitter.com/DartDen


"Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana".
Reply
#6
Philsuma Wrote:Aren't these the little Tanzanian guys that flooded in about 4 years ago....$20.00 each. Lots of red ticks on them ?

That would be correct Phil. A lot of them died off after they bred once or at least for me and my friends. Now they are extremely hard to find for sale.
Reply
#7
I heard something about them being over collected as they where super easy to catch in bunches (makes no sense to me as the couple I had moved fast as lightening) and so they stopped importing them.. Anyone know of their status in the wild as I'm sure it has a direct correlation to their recent availability, or lack there of.
Reply
#8
Supposedly they were collected en masse because most of their native range was about to be logged...thus the exporters wanted to get as many as possible out while they could. This is like 3rd or 4th hand info, so obviously I don't know how true it is, but seems plausible.
-Field Smith
Some frogs...
Reply
#9
fieldsmith Wrote:Supposedly they were collected en masse because most of their native range was about to be logged...thus the exporters wanted to get as many as possible out while they could. This is like 3rd or 4th hand info, so obviously I don't know how true it is, but seems plausible.
That is not quite the case. The reason the species became available ib captivity, is that someone within the ministry of natural resources and parks in Tanzania altered the local field guides that customes used to regulate exports of native wildlife, and posted pictures of this species under the name of Lygodactylus Luteopictaratus a rather common and widespread species in Tanzania. They were then able to bring out thousands of specimens using the forged field guides to bypass customs. Once this was caught all exports from Tanzania were stopped until the local field guides could be reviewed and corrected by outside experts.

This species has a very small native range(the best guess being a few square kilometers) within a protected reserve and thus was never legally elegible for export. The only saving grace is that this species matures quickly and breeds prolificly so that the native population which had at one time been pretty much strip mined has recovered nicely. Unfortunately now as was alluded to in the above post illegal logging does seem to be encroaching on their native range and unless the Tanzanian government takes more aggressive action the species future may very much be in doubt in the wild.
Reply
#10
Tanzania has had a ban on all wildlife exports for about a year after some similar shenanigans.

http://allafrica.com/stories/201108221268.html

The chameleon folks got hit pretty hard by it.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)