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Dendrobates auratus - male or female ?
#1
Hey I have had my Green and black Auratus for about 5 months now. They are in wonderful shape they eat twice a day once in the morning and once in the evening. When I bought them I was told they were 2.2 but the thing is I hear absolutely no calling. They are active the humidity is around 80 to 95 depending on the time of day. Also the temps are from mid 70's to mid 80's. Like I say they are active and doing really well they are not shy at all and they all seem to interact with one another. The thing is that they were supposed to be around 4 months out of the water. So they should be around 9 or 10 months old now. My questions are as follows. About when will I hear any calling? Also is there any way I can tell if I truly have 2.2? I would appreciate any advice. thank you
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#2
Their call can be very faint. You may never hear any calling.
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#3
yes their calls are very faint, but they could just be late bloomers. I have heard of some peoples frogs not calling untill they are 18 months old. Just depends on the frog. Just be patient and it will happen for you I am sure.

James
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#4
Hey thanks for the info I am glad to know that they are not very loud and that it is not the way I am taking care of them. Can you tell me what types of frogs are very vocal? I am setting up 6 more vivariums over the next 8 months or so one is a 35 Gallon Hex and the others are all 30 talls. I want frogs though that I can hear since I am setting up my living room as sort of a tropical room. Thanks and have a good day.
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#5
The D. Leucomelas I believe are the are the most vocal of the larger dart frogs. I don't have any myself but, I would love too. They have a canaryish call.
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#6
I have downloaded thier call and it is great I would love a few of them in a nice tank as a center for the many tanks I need to build. My goal is to have all the frog tanks and a room full of plants to establish a wonderful little slice of heaven for me to retreat to when the day is over and to let the stress go. Thanks for the help. I may have to put my plans on hold if I get deployed to help out with the effects of the latest hurricane.
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#7
Don't be too fooled....D. auratus can be loud. I recently had 20+ adults (sold them) and breed them for a couple of years. You will hear them if they call.

Give them some more time to mature,you will most likely start hearing calling after a year.

If you have some good top pics of them feel free to post and we could possibly sex them. Someone selling you 4 month old "sexed" (2.2.0) auratus most be pretty good, I would think they would be a little hard to sex at that age with 100% confidence.
Rob

E. anthonyi, D. imitator, C. azureiventris, D. amazonicus, D. lamasi (pan & pan gl), P. aurotaenia, D. variabilis, D. quinquevittatus, D. reticulatus, D. matecho, D. pumilio cauchero & escudos
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#8
I will do what I can to get some good pics of them from the top and the front. Then all I will have to do is figure out how to upload them to the site so you can see them. the guy I got them from said that he had to look at toe pads. I wanted breeding pairs since my wife teaches 4th grade and we wanted the kids to see tad developement and we were told that Auratas reproduce fairly frequently so the kids would be able to see tads in most all stages. I am hoping that that is good info since that is the reason we got them. Thanks
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#9
yes, you can tell the sex of auratus by toe pads, body shape, and of course calling or egg laying.

Auratus are prolific breeders and if you keep them in the right conditions, you will have an excellent chance of breeding them. Eggs take about 2 weeks to hatch and tads take about 3 months +/- to morph. They would make an excellent learning opportunity for the classroom. These frogs are pretty hardy.
Rob

E. anthonyi, D. imitator, C. azureiventris, D. amazonicus, D. lamasi (pan & pan gl), P. aurotaenia, D. variabilis, D. quinquevittatus, D. reticulatus, D. matecho, D. pumilio cauchero & escudos
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#10
I have them in a 20 gallon Long with many plants and a nice moist substrate. The Temps like I said earlier are in the mid 70's to sometimes low 80's. The humidity is around 80 percent and is fairly constant with very little shift. They are active as all get out and none of them are shy at all they come running to the glass when I walk up as if to say feed me again please. All I know is that if I ate like they do I would be 400 pounds within a few weeks. I guess the point of this whole post is to see if these are the right conditions you are talking about in your post? Sorry I got all off track there. Thanks for all the help.
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#11
Sounds like your viv conditions are great. Good job.

Too funny about the eating, the funny thing is, I sold most of mine because they ate too damn much. I had so many FF cultures to support these guys it was getting crazy. I am now going for the smaller frogs.

Best of luck on your auratus. They are an excellent frog.
Rob

E. anthonyi, D. imitator, C. azureiventris, D. amazonicus, D. lamasi (pan & pan gl), P. aurotaenia, D. variabilis, D. quinquevittatus, D. reticulatus, D. matecho, D. pumilio cauchero & escudos
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#12
I know what you mean they do like to eat don't they? I am thinking about setting up a springtail culture for them as well so I do not have to do as many FF. I still do not know enough about the springtail though to start one. I am still reading and learning. I just got a 150 gallon aquarium given to me all I need to do is pick it up. I want to set that up so bad I can not stand it. I am wondering with a tank that size if I could put maybe some citronella, and some azures together ? maybe 4 of each. I see that tank in my head all green and lush but I will probably work on that till next season. I will try to get some pics of the frogs today while I am feeding.
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#13
Don't be intimidated by springtails, they are easy to maintain and an excellent food source for all darts (however, some of the bigger ones will not bother).

www.edsflymeatinc.com sells starter kits with springtails, charcoal, yeast, media, and a plastic shoebox to raise them.

Congrats on nabbing that big viv. Big viv means lots of upfront planning. Take the time and plan everything out, a viv that big is not easy to tear down if a mistake is made.
Rob

E. anthonyi, D. imitator, C. azureiventris, D. amazonicus, D. lamasi (pan & pan gl), P. aurotaenia, D. variabilis, D. quinquevittatus, D. reticulatus, D. matecho, D. pumilio cauchero & escudos
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#14
I know what you mean this is very exciting but also slightly intimidating I keep looking at it and wondering where do I start what do I do? I will figure it out but wow kinda daunting. Thanks for the link to eds.
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