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Why use scientific names instead of common names ?
#1
Might be a dumb question but just curious. Why does the frogging community use the scientific names for frogs instead of common names?
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#2
Hey Boss Frog, great question!!! I'm gonna give my thoughts and I'm sure other will as well.
Often times importers will give animals a "common name" or "trade name" based on coloration. If two importers import the same blue and yellow frog they will name it two different things. Add to that that so many of our frog species have many different morphs/locales and things could get even more confusing. Using the scientific names eliminates almost all the chances for misidentifying the frog. There is no question what species it is. A proper combination of the correct species name and locale means that you can be almost 100% sure that everyone is calling a certain frog the same thing.
I also like to think that the frog hobby is just a cut above the rest of the herp hobby.
Jon
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#3
I think most hobbyist have a scientific interest and take the keeping of these animals pretty seriously. Some people probably fancy themselves as actual scientists as well. Plus, it's just cooler and easier saying pumilio, than strawberry dart frog.
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"Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana".
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#4
The only dumb question is the one you don't ask!

Degrees use Latin names as this is specific and isn't subject to regional variation, the best example I can think of isn't dart related. In Europe we have green tree frogs.
(Hyla aborea), in the states you also have green tree frogs (Hyla cinera), the common name is the same but they are two completely different animals with different needs

Hope that makes sense?
Ben

Sent from my GT-I9100 using Tapatalk 2
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#5
This hobby actually uses a huge mix of common names (often wrong) and scientific names (often changing) . So it is pretty much always a mess.
Cayos and Sirensis for sale BTW.
Darts with parasites are analogous to mixed tanks, there are no known benefits to the frogs with either.


If tone is more important to you than content, you are at the wrong place.

My new email address is: rich.frye@icloud.com and new phone number is 773 577 3476
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#6
Thanks for explanations but, only have one problem,How do you pronounce them? :? :oops:
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#7
Boss Frog Wrote:Thanks for explanations but, only have one problem,How do you pronounce them? :? :oops:
Most of the time, wrong. lol Everyone seems to pronounce them differently. Oh well, I'd rather say Leucomelas or Leuc then 'Bumble bee frog" :roll:
Glenn
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#8
frogfreak Wrote:
Boss Frog Wrote:Thanks for explanations but, only have one problem,How do you pronounce them? :? :oops:
Most of the time, wrong. lol Everyone seems to pronounce them differently. Oh well, I'd rather say Leucomelas or Leuc then 'Bumble bee frog" :roll:


Good point :wink:
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#9
Philsuma Wrote:I think most hobbyist have a scientific interest and take the keeping of these animals pretty seriously. Some people probably fancy themselves as actual scientists as well. Plus, it's just cooler and easier saying pumilio, than strawberry dart frog.

In practice I use abrv such as pums, sylvie, imi, bene VERY scientific Tongue
Scott - North Dallas
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#10
So would be bad for me to say" I want a cute frog with pretty blue dots" Confusedhock:
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#11
Scientific names are used for just that purpose - scientific discussion throughout the world. You use Dendrobates leucomelas and scientists all over the world know what your talking about. Common names change from country to country and sometimes within a county. This doesn't touch on the subject of varietal or locality names which are not scientific. These also variable from country by country even its only a matter of the local language. That was the basis behind scientific names.

Best,

Chuck
Charles Powell
www.frogday.org
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#12
RichFrye Wrote:This hobby actually uses a huge mix of common names (often wrong) and scientific names (often changing) . So it is pretty much always a mess.
Cayos and Sirensis for sale BTW.

That's it exactly. Ask 10 different people and you'll probably get 5 different common names.
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#13
chuckpowell Wrote:Scientific names are used for just that purpose - scientific discussion throughout the world. You use Dendrobates leucomelas and scientists all over the world know what your talking about. Common names change from country to country and sometimes within a county. This doesn't touch on the subject of varietal or locality names which are not scientific. These also variable from country by country even its only a matter of the local language. That was the basis behind scientific names.

Best,

Chuck



Chuck, best answer so far!! You must be a genius, or at least sound like one. Tongue
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#14
I'm a scientists and have used scientific names for various animals for over 50 years (https://profile.usgs.gov/cpowell/). They come pretty easy to me and I dislike common names.

Best,

Chuck
Charles Powell
www.frogday.org
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#15
[quote="chuckpowell"]I'm a scientists and have used scientific names for various animals for over 50 years (https://profile.usgs.gov/cpowell/). They come pretty easy to me and I dislike common names.

Best,

Chuck[/quote
Very impressive work, if you need any volunteers for any field work :wink:
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#16
By the very definition then all dendrobates tinctorious are all the same. no matter whether they come from another locale, look completely different, act completely different. Interesting melting pot going on then!

common names become relevant in captive breeding also. so you know which line it is. and WHERE it came from. saurian.net if you are so inclined to read fact sheets (on locale).

perhaps some one here has better reference for it....

Furthermore that may just be where his came from....
2.1.0 Cobalt
1.1.0 Aurotaenia
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#17
Your correct - scientifically their all the same thing. The thing is that Dendrobates tinctorius all look the same except for color and they their behavior is pretty much the same across the board. Take away the color patters and I defy anyone to tell what morph is what in D. tinctorius. Common names aren't relevant in our hobby either, as they change over time and from place to place. Locality identifiers are important to the hobby, but these aren't common names. The common name for Dendrobates tinctorius is the Dying poison frog. No one in the hobby uses that name and I'd bet very, very few people know why its called the Dyeing poison frog (its not dying or for that matter dieing - hint: it has to do with parrots).

Best,

Chuck

cablemandan Wrote:By the very definition then all dendrobates tinctorious are all the same. no matter whether they come from another locale, look completely different, act completely different. Interesting melting pot going on then!

common names become relevant in captive breeding also. so you know which line it is. and WHERE it came from. saurian.net if you are so inclined to read fact sheets (on locale).

perhaps some one here has better reference for it....

Furthermore that may just be where his came from....
Charles Powell
www.frogday.org
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#18
WTB pums. 50 bux per.. shouldn't matter what kind so everyone send me a PM plx
2.1.0 Cobalt
1.1.0 Aurotaenia
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#19
Quote:Your correct - scientifically their all the same thing. The thing is that Dendrobates tinctorius all look the same except for color and they their behavior is pretty much the same across the board. Take away the color patters and I defy anyone to tell what morph is what in D. tinctorius.

So I look like you kind of.. like a person. Then we should also assume that is correct by this logic. But I could be slightly a different color, or a hunchback. But scientifically speaking we are the same.

You have a common name? or do you go by your scientific name? I get your argument slightly, but it's not relevant since there are almost 8 billion of you on the world.
2.1.0 Cobalt
1.1.0 Aurotaenia
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#20
The animal kingdom might not be the best example but if you are a plant person common names can really be vague.
I keep voodoo lilies and saying that is very vague. it could include some of the genus Amorphophallus, Typhonium, or Dracunculus for example. And all of those have many species within each genus. There is at least 150 or more species of Amorphophallus and still more that may become discovered. So if I say I have Amorphophallus atroviridis then there is no doubt what I am describing. If I tell you I have Bamboo do I have a lucky bamboo (Draceana sanderiana) or maybe Heavenly Bamboo ( Nandina domestica) or is it Moso bamboo (Phyllostachys edulis). The first two of those plants are not even true bamboo. The last one is a true bamboo and it is the large forests you see in those Asian films. Bamboo is also in the grass family so if I pointed at a forest of 70 foot tall and 8 inch diameter bamboo and said look at that grass growing on the hillside, you may not think to look at the forest of P. edulis. How can you see the grass for the forest? Smile pun intended.
-Dan
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