Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

Beginner Dart Frog hobbiest questions
#1

I have a few questions for dart frogs
1.what is the best and relatively cheap dart frog species?
2. What substrate should I use?
3. How do I keep the moisture at 100%?
4. What plants do you recommend? Is aniubias ok?
Also any other tips would be great.
Thank you


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Reply
#2

The answers to all you questions are right here on Dart Den! Go to Forum, and start reading, under dart frogs, and under vivariums. There is tons of information available to you! Many of your questions don't have 1 "right" answer--and after you have read and researched, and read and researched some more, you will start to find the answers to your questions.

Before I built my first viv, cultured my first fruit fly, or purchased my first dart frog, I spent months reading here, and other places, to educate myself about this hobby. Believe me, the more you know about frogs, vivs, substrates, humidity, plants, etc, the happier you will be, and your frogs too!

Good luck!

P. Terribilis orange, R. Imitator Cainarachi Valley, D. Leucomelas, D. Auratus, D. Azureus, P. vittatus, D. cobalts, D.Oyapok, Bombina Orientalis
Reply
#3

Ok thanks.



Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Reply
#4

viewtopic.php?f=27&t=5777

viewforum.php?f=27

https://www.facebook.com/dartden/

https://twitter.com/DartDen


"Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana".
Reply
#5

mbsplit2 Wrote:I have a few questions for dart frogs
1.what is the best and relatively cheap dart frog species?
2. What substrate should I use?
3. How do I keep the moisture at 100%?
4. What plants do you recommend? Is aniubias ok?
Also any other tips would be great.
Thank you


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Obviously research prior to acquiring frogs is your best bet, but I'll take a stab at your questions.
1: There are plenty of relatively hardy and inexpensive darts that are suitable for a beginner. Tinc group frogs (tinctorius, leucomelas, and auratus) are all good choices. You can't go wrong choosing leucs, lots of people start with them bc they are bold, hardy, inexpensive, and have a great call. In my experience auratus aren't as bold, but still great frogs. Another good option would be Epipedobates anthonyi; they are bold, hardy, inexpensive, do well in groups, are prolific breeders, and have a pleasant call. But don't feel stuck with classic "beginner" frogs; with proper research of husbandry techniques and specific care requirements you could easily succeed with most dart species. My banded imitators are super bold and very hardy, don't see why an informed beginner couldn't do well with them. Look at pictures, see what jumps out at you, and go from there.
2: There are plenty of viv-suitable substrates. You want a sub that drains well while holding humidity. I use a mixture of organic peat, fine tree fern fiber, fine fir bark, milled sphagnum, shredded oak leaves, and high-fired clay aggregate (turface). Others use long-fiber sphagnum, clay-based substrates, or even organic potting soil (though it can get too saturated). Many vendors sell pre-made substrates, may be the way to go if you are only doing one viv.
3: You don't have to keep the humidity at 100%, but to keep it high you can utilize a glass top and spray mist often. Many people install misting systems, but I've found that hand misting regularly works well. I don't even mist every day, sometimes just 3 times a week.
4: There are tons of inexpensive and hardy plants that are viv suitable. Pothos, philodendrons, alocasias, aglonemas, spathophyllums, anthuriums, ferns, orchids, bromeliads, etc...just do a little research to avoid toxic or irritating plants.
Good luck!

-Field Smith
Some frogs...
Reply
#6

Thank you so much fieldsmith. You're info is extremely helpful.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)